Hostess, Butterball, Snyders of Hanover, Premio, Furmanos and Delhaize America are the latest firms to join up to the National Salt Reduction Initiative

Hostess, Butterball, Snyder's of Hanover, Premio, Furmano's and Delhaize America are the latest firms to join up to the National Salt Reduction Initiative

Food manufacturers including turkey processor Butterball and snack maker Snyder's of Hanover are the latest US food firms to join up to the National Salt Reduction Initiative (NSRI).

Butterball, Snyder's of Hanover, Premio, Furmano's and retailer Delhaize America are the latest US food firms to join the scheme, it was announced on Tuesday (23 November). The same day, US baker Hostess Brands also said it would expand its commitments under the initiative.

The NRSI is a programme launched earlier this year to cut the level of salt in US packaged and restaurant foods by 25% over five years.

The latest six entrants will join 16 firms already part of the scheme. They have committed to reduce sodium in 29 of the NSRI packaged foods categories. Heinz has said it is expanding its earlier commitment to include some frozen entrees, in addition to ketchup and tomato sauce.

Turkey, poultry and deli meat producer Butterball has committed to meeting the sodium-reduction targets in its deli meat and hot dog products.

Delhaize America said it will reduce sodium levels in the products it manufactures across 22 packaged-food categories, including frozen pizza, cereal and butter.

Furmano's, a supplier of foods to consumers and restaurants, will cut salt across its canned beans, baked beans and tomato products, while wholesale baker Hostess has committed to reducing salt across its line of bread products.

Family-owned sausage maker Premio has said it will cut salt in its uncooked sausages, and Snyder's of Hanover is to cut the salt in its unflavoured chips.

The companies join firms including Hain Celestial, Kraft Foods, Mars Inc and McCain Foods as part of the initiative.

"Reducing salt intake has been a public health priority for decades," said Dr Thomas Farley, New York City health commissioner. "The national initiative that New York City spearheaded has begun the work to achieve this goal, and we're pleased to see the partnership expand and grow."