User-friendly eXtremeAg.com, a completely free agricultural website for America's farmers, has conducted an exclusive interview with Nebraska's state climatologist, Al Dutcher. The Nebraska corn crop is still in very serious trouble, despite recent rainfall across the state. Nebraska typically produces the third-largest corn crop in the U.S., behind Iowa and Illinois.Dutcher told eXtremeAg.com that commodity traders in Chicago are missing the point when they hear that Nebraska has received beneficial rainfall the past two weeks. "Now, what (traders) have lost in the whole perspective is that even with the (recent) rain that we've had, still, from last Sept. 1 to mid-June, this is the driest to the fifth-driest growing year we've had (depending upon location of the state)--and this is based on 112 years of data," said Dutcher. "So, yes, the rains were nice to receive, but the problem is we have absolutely, positively no soil moisture going into the (recent rains). Everything was burning up. So what we've done is just keep the crop alive. That's about the only thing we've done." Dutcher said that going forward in the growing season, the corn crop is going to require 10 inches of moisture in the next month just to produce an "adequate" corn yield. "Normally, we get from 3.0 to 3.5 inches for the month of July. So we need triple moisture just to keep the status quo and produce an adequate yield." If Nebraska goes moisture free the next 10 days and temps heat up, "we're going to lose our (dryland) crop here." He said western Iowa is not in much better shape than eastern Nebraska. To see the complete story, and to access free cash grain quotes, professional charts, and technical analysis plus more, just go to