Consider a children's market larger than the entire population of Mexico. With 114 million children under the age of four, India is just that. By 2050 India's population will be larger than China's, according to demographers. And while most live at subsistence levels, today widespread starvation is an image from the past. India, in fact, enters the 21st Century as a flourishing economy that has achieved self-sufficiency in food production."India's sheer size and diversity are enough to make it an attractive market for nearly every major food, beverage and agribusiness company," says Tara Smith, Senior Analyst at PROMAR International. "Some companies have been burned by the promise of huge markets in other countries. But those with a clear understanding of who their potential customers are will be more than comfortable targeting the 200 million or so Indians with money to spend on branded food and beverages, for example."PROMAR's new study, "The Sub-Continent in Transition: A strategic assessment of food, beverage, and agribusiness opportunities in India to 2010," examines the subtleties of India's food markets. The study provides insight into the nation's infrastructure, government policy and consumer behavior that form the basis for evaluating potential investment in this dynamic market."The Sub-Continent in Transition," which has just been completed, provides the most up-to-date view of opportunities and risks in food and agriculture in the Indian sub-continent. The cost for this comprehensive analysis of market opportunities and strategic recommendations is $15,000."This is a market full of surprises," says Smith. "From the growing number of "Moderns" who define themselves by products and purchases outside the traditional, to an eyebrow-raising 78% of the population that is not strictly vegetarian, India's food markets today defy stereotypes."Details on the study including the table of contents and sample pages can be viewed at: