A Grand Prairie company that sells prepared foods from catering trucks is voluntarily recalling several of its products after laboratory testing by the Texas Department of Health (TDH) found Listeria monocytogenes in one of the company's foods.
 
Industrial Catering is recalling its potato beef tacos; egg and chorizo tacos; bacon, egg and cheese taquitos; and sausage, egg and cheese taquitos prepared and sold on March 26.  The foods were sold in two-and six-count packages from the company's catering trucks in Dallas, Tarrant, Collin and Bell counties.

Leftover products were donated to charities.

The recalled foods were individually wrapped in foil, placed on Styrofoam trays and wrapped with clear plastic.  The product code number 085-280 appears on the packaging.  Some of the products may be labeled "The Best of the West."  Trucks selling the products are marked with "Industrial Catering, Inc., Snack Service."

TDH testing of the company's beef and potato taco was done as part of routine surveillance by TDH's meat safety assurance program.  Test results were available Wednesday, and by late Friday TDH officials had determined the extent of the recommended recall.

Tom Sidwa, acting director of TDH's meat safety assurance program, said it's likely that most if not all of the recalled products have been consumed but that some customers may have frozen the foods for later consumption.  He said any saved products should not be eaten.

Sidwa said it's too soon to know if there have been any illnesses associated with the recalled products.  The incubation period, or time from exposure to the development of symptoms, ranges from 12 hours to three weeks and is sometimes longer.

The bacterial organism causes listeriosis, an infection especially threatening to unborn babies and to people with weakened immune systems. Symptoms of listeriosis include fever, muscle aches and sometimes diarrhea or nausea.  If the infection spreads to the nervous system, headache, stiff neck, confusion, loss of balance, or convulsions may occur.

Sidwa said people experiencing any of these symptoms should contact a doctor if they ate one of the recalled products.  The illness can be treated with antibiotics.