UK: Research links low income to poor diet

By Press Release | 26 January 2001

Food retailer Iceland is helping children across the country learn about food and nutrition in response to research which shows that people on a low income are more likely to neglect their diet. The research, carried out by Mintel International, reveals that poor households pay less attention to the quality of their diet, and families on a tight budget are less aware of the health risks associated with eating a poor diet then those in more affluent households. The survey also indicates that only 18 per cent of all parents questioned attempt to follow the five-a-day fruit and vegetable guidelines issued by the Government.

just-food articles are only available to registered users and members.

Join now for increased access

There are various access options to choose from. All provide instant access to the latest news, insight and expert analysis.

If you’re already a member, login here.

Food retailer Iceland is helping children across the country learn about food and nutrition in response to research which shows that people on a low income are more likely to neglect their diet. The research, carried out by Mintel International, reveals that poor households pay less attention to the quality of their diet, and families on a tight budget are less aware of the health risks associated with eating a poor diet then those in more affluent households. The survey also indicates that only 18 per cent of all parents questioned attempt to follow the five-a-day fruit and vegetable guidelines issued by the Government.

  • Unlimited access to all the latest global food news and insight
  • Expert analysis that puts the news into context
  • Exclusive interviews with leading industry figures
  • Monthly management briefings with detailed analysis on hot topics
  • Personalised RSS feeds and email newsletters
  • 10-year archive of news, insight and intelligence
  • Discounts on just-food market research
  • Plus much more

If you’re already a member, login here

Not what you were looking for?

Search just-food:

More articles related to this one

BRAZIL: Port of Paranagua stops GM exports despite court ruling
The Brazilian port of Paranagua stepped up its ban on exports of genetically modified soybeans in May, despite a Supreme Court ruling in April that the port must ship the GM beans, the Dow Jones news agency reports.

EUROPE: EFSA declares GM maize strain safe
The European Food Safety Authority has declared that genetically modified maize strain Bt11 maize, genetically modified to resist certain butterfly and moth pests, and containing a tolerance to the herbicide glufosinate, is safe for humans and the environment.

RUSSIA: Survey shows Russians not keen on GM food
Two-thirds of Russians are unwilling to eat food containing genetically modified ingredients, according to a poll conducted by the All-Russia Public Opinion Research Center (VTsIOM) and reported by the RIA Novosti news agency.

Welcome to the home of food information, insight & intelligence

Not a member? Join here

Decrease font sizeDecrease font sizeDecrease font size Increase font sizeIncrease font sizeIncrease font size Comment on this article Email this to a friend Print this page