The spokesperson for Tengelmann could not confirm who supplied the lasagnes to Kaisers

The spokesperson for Tengelmann could not confirm who supplied the lasagnes to Kaiser's

German retailer Tengelmann has confirmed its Kaiser's supermarket chain has pulled frozen lasagnes from shelves amid concerns the lines could contain horse meat.

A spokesperson for the group told just-food today (11 February) that it had stopped selling its A&P lasagne across its stores and will begin carrying out tests on the products.

"We do not have any proof yet that horse meat was found, but further tests have to be made. The removal from the shelves was due to reasons of precautionary customer protection only," the spokesperson said.

Germany is the latest country in Europe to become embroiled in the horse meat scandal, which has taken in processors and retailers across the continent, with frozen food giant Findus at its centre.

Findus admitted on Thursday its frozen lasagnes on sale in the UK could contain up to 100% horse meat. The company, owned by private-equity firm Lion Capital, has also had to recall products on sale in France and Sweden.

Yesterday, major retail chains in France, including Carrefour and Casino, recalled Findus products and those manufactured by Comigel, the French supplier that made the lasagnes containing the horse meat for the frozen-food firm.

It is understood Comigel has supplied the German market in the past. However, a spokesperson for Tengelmann could not confirm the supplier of the A&P ready meals on sale at Kaiser's stores when contacted by just-food this afternoon.

An abbatoir in Romania was today alleged to be the source of the horse meat contained in Findus products that have sparked the crisis that has rocked Europe's food industry.

Initial investigations by the French government have linked the contamination to an unnamed company in Romania, via traders in Cyprus and the Netherlands, a meat processor in France and a lasagne producer in the country to frozen food giant Findus.

French government ministers were set to meet with industry officials today for talks on the situation.

In the UK, where the scandal has dominated national news bulletins, industry and government officials met on Saturday to discuss the crisis.

The UK food industry will this week test beef products across the industry for horse meat.