Chobani had changed label on UK yoghurts to strained after court upheld Fage complaint

Chobani had changed label on UK yoghurts to 'strained' after court upheld Fage complaint

Chobani's request for another appeal against a ruling in the UK that forbid the US yoghurt maker from using the term "Greek yoghurt" has been refused by the country's Supreme Court.

The company wanted to launch a fresh appeal to overturn a permanent injunction handed down by the High Court last year after rival Fage launched a legal battle.

In January, the UK Court of Appeal upheld last year's judgement that ruled 'Greek yoghurt' had to be made in Greece. Chobani's yoghurts are made in the US.

After that appeal was turned down, Chobani said it would turn to the UK Supreme Court. "We remain of the view that the population of the UK know and understand Greek yoghurt to be a product description regardless of where it is made," it said at the time. "We remain committed to the UK market and to breaking the monopoly on the use of the term Greek yoghurt enjoyed by Fage."

However, the UK Supreme Court has dismissed Chobani's request to appeal. A spokesperson for the court confirmed to just-food Chobani had been "refused permission to appeal" on the grounds "the appeal does not raise a point of law of general public importance".

A spokesperson for Chobani said: "While the UK is not currently a market of strategic focus for us, and we have not exported products there since 2013, we are disappointed that the UK Supreme Court refused to prevent the monopoly on the use of the term Greek yoghurt.

"We will continue to advocate our view that the population of the UK knows and understands Greek yoghurt to be a product description in terms of how it’s made not where it is made, similar to things like French fries and English muffins in the US."