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USA: Revised FDA seafood advisory "underscores benefits of canned fish for pregnant women," says NFPA

15 Jan 2001

A newly revised advisory on seafood and mercury, issued by the Food and Drug Administration, "reiterates the health benefits and the safety of canned fish," according to the National Food Processors Association (NFPA).  FDA's advisory is specifically targeted to pregnant women and women of childbearing age.

USA: Consumer confidence in biotechnology "won't be enhanced by warning labels," says NFPA

11 Jan 2001

A new report by the Consumer Federation of America (CFA), calling for mandatory labeling of foods produced through the use of agricultural biotechnology, "is the wrong approach to enhancing consumers' understanding of biotechnology," according to the National Food Processors Association (NFPA).

USA: Sound dietary guidance is best way to address hypertension among Americans, says NFPA

4 Jan 2001

Responding to a new study on the effects of dietary modifications on blood pressure, published today in the New England Journal of Medicine, Dr. Rhona Applebaum, Executive Vice President of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs for the National Food Processors Association (NFPA), made the following comments:

USA: NFPA applauds establishment of national organic standard, but notes "organic" does not mean safer or more nutritious

20 Dec 2000

The announcement of a final rule establishing a comprehensive national standard for organic food labeling was commended by the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) as "a step forward for uniform food labeling standards."  But NFPA also cautioned that "It must be made clear that the 'organic' label on certain foods does not mean that they are safer or more nutritious than conventional food products."

USA: GMA, coalition groups applaud request for ITC analysis of trade barriers faced by food and beverage industry

1 Nov 2000

The Grocery Manufacturers of America and a coalition of industry groups applauded a congressional request for the United States International Trade Commission (ITC) to conduct an in-depth analysis of the barriers facing exports of processed food and beverages around the world.House Ways and Means Chairman Rep.

USA: NFPA calls bill addressing food biotechnology "well-intentioned, but premature"

12 Oct 2000

A bill introduced today by Senator Richard Durbin (D-IL) - addressing the regulatory process used by the Food and Drug Administration prior to the introduction into the market of biotech foods - is "well-intentioned, but premature," according to the National Food Processors Association (NFPA)."NFPA shares Senator Durbin's desire to strengthen consumer confidence in government oversight of the safety of food biotechnology," said Brian Folkerts, NFPA's Vice President of Government Affairs.

USA; 'User-Friendly' ozone ready to become latest tool for food safety in United States

10 Oct 2000

It leaves no taste, odor or flavor, and yet - by passing the Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) initial review in an extremely rigorous process - it has the potential to become the next major tool for the safe treatment, storage and processing of nearly every type of food, including meats, poultry, fruits and vegetables, in the United States.

USA: NFPA applauds court action dismissing Biotech policy lawsut

6 Oct 2000

The National Food Processors Association (NFPA) applauded a decision by a U.S. District Court judge to dismiss a lawsuit challenging the Food and Drug Administration's current policy for biotech foods, which considers those foods produced through the use of agricultural biotechnology to be essentially the same as conventional foods, therefore not requiring special labeling or premarket approval. Dr. Rhona Applebaum, NFPA's Executive Vice President for Scientific and Regulatory Affairs, stated that "The U.S. District Court's decision supports NFPA's long-held positions that premarket notification, not premarket approval, should be required, and that the biotechnology process, in and of itself, does not warrant special labeling requirements." U.S. District Court Judge Colleen Kollar-Kotelly dismissed the lawsuit on September 29. The lawsuit was filed in 1998 by several anti-biotech activist groups.In January 2000, FDA Commissioner Dr. Jane Henney stated that "We are not aware of any information that foods developed through genetic engineering differ as a class in quality, safety, or any other attribute from foods developed through conventional means. That's why there has been no requirement to add a special label saying that they are bioengineered."NFPA is the voice of the $460 billion food processing industry on scientific and public policy issues involving food safety, nutrition, technical and regulatory matters and consumer affairs. For more information on this issue, contact Timothy Willard, NFPA's Vice President of Communications, at (202) 637-8060, or visit NFPA's Website at

USA: NFPA calls activist groups's report faulting FDA actions on Food irradiation "just plain wrong"

3 Oct 2000

Charges by an activist group that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not used adequate science in approving the use of food irradiation on a variety of foods, "are just plain wrong," according to Dr. Rhona Applebaum, Executive Vice President of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs for the National Food Processors Association (NFPA).

USA: NFPA announces new Food Safety and Quality Systems Supplier Audit Program

2 Oct 2000

The National Food Processors Association (NFPA) has announced a new program to coordinate food safety audits of suppliers on behalf of food processors. "The Food Safety and Quality Systems Supplier Audit Program has a simple but very important purpose: to enhance food safety standards and create efficiencies in the way audits for suppliers and processors alike," said Kelly Johnston, NFPA's Executive Vice President for Government Affairs and Communications, who has served as the program's coordinator since its inception.

USA: In testimony to house of representatives, NFPA strongly opposes"Country of Origin" legislation

27 Sep 2000

In testimony submitted to the U.S. House of Representatives' Subcommittee on Livestock and Horticulture, NFPA urged Congress to reject the mandatory country of origin labeling proposals contained in H.R.1144, the Country of Origin Meat Labeling Act of 1999. The Subcommittee held a hearing on the legislation on September 26."NFPA opposes the legislation's rigid mandatory country of origin labeling requirements," said Kristin Pearson, NFPA's Director of Federal Legislative Affairs. "Such requirements convey no health or safety information to consumers and would do nothing to enhance the safety of the U.S. food supply. Further, country of origin labeling requirements would be too costly to domestic interests, would almost certainly be viewed internationally as a barrier to trade, and may result in retaliatory measures by countries that trade with the United States."In its testimony, NFPA noted that:

USA: NFPA urges FDA to deny "Added Sugars" labeling petition

27 Sep 2000

In formal comments to the Food and Drug Administration, the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) urged the Agency to deny a petition requesting that nutrition labels on foods be revised so that "added sugars" would be declared separately from total sugars. NFPA submitted comments on the added sugars labeling petition to FDA on September 25.

USA: In senate testimony, NFPA supports appropriate use of microbiological testing in food safety system

20 Sep 2000

Microbiological testing can provide important information to help produce safe foods, but only if the testing and any standards applied are science-based and used appropriately, the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) told a Senate Agriculture Committee hearing today."Microbiological standards are not a new concept, as they have been applied for decades in the processed food area," said Dane Bernard, NFPA's Vice President of Food Safety Programs.

USA: NFPA hails senate passage of legislation to establish permanent normal trade relations with China

20 Sep 2000

NFPA and the food processing industry hailed a long-awaited and hard fought victory today as the U.S. Senate passed by a vote of 83 to 15 a bill to permanently liberalize trade with China and end 20 years of annual congressional review of China's trade status. "This landmark legislation is in the best interests of the U.S. food processing industry and our nation's consumers," said John R. Cady, NFPA's President and CEO. "NFPA has long urged the Senate to pass this bill, which will help ensure that U.S. food companies have access to and open trade with this important market." Permanent Normal Trade Relations (PNTR) with China "has been a high priority of the U.S. food industry," noted Kristin Pearson, NFPA's Director of Federal Legislative Affairs. "Granting China PNTR and membership into the World Trade Organization (WTO) will level the playing field for U.S. food processor by restricting onerous international tariffs and dramatically opening China's markets to American products, agriculture, and services. Also important to the food industry, membership into the WTO for China will help to eliminate non-science-based food safety measures in China that restrict entry of U.S. beef, pork, poultry, and wheat. PNTR will ensure China's integration into the global trading system will take place under a system of internationally-agreed rules, backed up by WTO dispute settlement procedures, and WTO-authorized sanctions in the event of non-compliance."NFPA has been outspoken in its support for the China trade bill, and has been an active participant in industry coalition activities to support China PNTR. "We also would like to thank all our members, especially, the members of NFPA's Grassroots Leadership Education Action Network (GLEAN) who weighed in on this important issue as China PNTR moved through both the House and the Senate." For more information, contact Kristin Pearson at (202) 639-5937.

USA: NFPA to host briefings for industry and media on supplier audit program

11 Sep 2000

The National Food Processors Association (NFPA) will host two briefings in September - one for industry members and one for the media - on a new program to coordinate food safety audits of suppliers on behalf of food processors. On September 20, NFPA will host a briefing in Chicago for professionals who conduct independent food safety and quality system audits to provide information on NFPA's supplier audit program.

USA: Education is most effective means of combating Food poisoning, says NFPA

9 Aug 2000

"Education is the most effective tool we have to combat food poisoning" according to Kelly Johnston, Executive Vice President for Government Affairs and Communications of the National Food Processors Association (NFPA). His comments came in response to a report issued today by the Center for Science in the Public Interest, examining foodborne illness outbreaks in the United States during the past decade.

USA: NFPA's Jenny Scott elected president of International association for food protection

9 Aug 2000

Jenny Scott, Senior Director in the Office of Food Safety Programs for the National Food Processors Association, will assume the office of President of the International Association for Food Protection (IAFP), at the group's annual meeting this week in Atlanta.IAFP is a leading international association of food safety professionals.

USA: 'Fresh' Does Not Necessarily Mean 'Raw', Nfpa Tells Fda Meeting

24 Jul 2000

When it comes to food labeling, the term "fresh" does not necessarily mean the same as "raw," according to the National Food Processors Association (NFPA)."'Fresh' is a powerful term to describe foods, and it is clearly a word that conveys a strong message of product quality in the minds of consumers," said Regina Hildwine, NFPA's Senior Director of Food Labeling in Standards, in testimony delivered at a public meeting held by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

USA: Strong Regulations Already Exist for 'Functional Foods,' Says NFPA

19 Jul 2000

Responding to calls by the Center for Science in the Public Interest for the creation of additional regulation for "functional foods" -- those foods with health benefits beyond basic nutrition -- Dr. Rhona Applebaum, Executive Vice President of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs for the National Food Processors Association (NFPA), made the following comments:"CSPI somehow misses the point that functional foods are foods. As such, they must meet existing strong regulatory requirements for safety and for accuracy of label statements. There is no need for functional foods be regulated differently than conventional foods; the Food and Drug Administration already has ample regulatory authority to oversee the safety of these foods and to ensure that claims on these products do not mislead consumers."NFPA's position on all foods is that their ingredients must be safe, and any claims made concerning a food must be truthful, non-misleading, and supported by sound science. NFPA has urged FDA to establish a flexible and scientifically supported policy for health claims and structure-function claims on foods and supplements."Functional foods can play an important role in enhancing the health of consumers -- and NFPA believes that national regulatory policy should be designed to help support the availability of functional foods and information on their potential health benefits. We urge CSPI to stop attacking functional foods as a category, and instead to work with government and the food industry to ensure that consumers have access to important information on the health benefits of foods."NFPA is the voice of the $460 billion food processing industry on scientific and public policy issues involving food safety, nutrition, technical and regulatory matters and consumer affairs.Visit NFPA's Website at

USA: NFPA Faults Recommendations to Congress Made In GAO 'Functional Foods' Report

12 Jul 2000

In response to a report issued today by the U.S. General Accounting Office, which focused on overseeing the safety of dietary supplements and "functional foods," Dr. Rhona Applebaum, Executive Vice President of Scientific and Regulatory Affairs for the National Food Processors Association (NFPA), made the following comments:"The safety of both dietary supplements and functional foods is of paramount importance to the food industry.

USA: NFPA Applauds Agriculture Committee Approval of National Uniformity Bill

30 Jun 2000

The National Food Processors Association (NFPA) applauded the approval today by the Senate Agriculture Committee of a bill to establish uniformity of food safety warning requirements throughout the 50 states, calling the bill "consumer-friendly legislation."NFPA has been a leading advocate for the introduction and passage of national uniformitylegislation.

USA: HACCP Has Led to a Safer Food Supply, Says NFPA

22 Jun 2000

OIG Report "Not a Safety Indicator" for Nation's Meat and Poultry Supply Today, the Office of Inspector General (OIG) for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) released a report reviewing various aspects of USDA's meat and poultry inspection activities. Jenny Scott, Senior Director of Food Safety Programs for the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) commented on the reports:"The food industry has worked closely with the U.S. Department of Agriculture on implementation of Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points (HACCP) requirements. Carrying out this program and this partnership has led to a safer food supply in the United States. We look forward to further cooperative efforts with USDA to improve HACCP systems. We are committed to HACCP and food safety. This OIG report should by no means be construed as an indication that the safety of the U.S. food supply is in question, nor used as a justification for returning to the old 'command and control' system of inspection that HACCP replaces."The OIG report is being carefully studied by industry. Whether it is FDA's seafood HACCP requirements or USDA's HACCP requirements for meat and poultry, no one can expect implementation to proceed without occasional hitches. What is required now are technical corrections or refinements that will optimize the effectiveness of HACCP. The industry has submitted a petition asking FSIS to make certain changes in the HACCP regulations that we believe will facilitate improvement in HACCP implementation. We are encouraging USDA to take the steps necessary to improve issues related to documentation of existing programs. "NFPA does not believe that increased agency authority, such as civil monetary penalties, is necessary. Rather, USDA's Food Safety and Inspection Service should more effectively utilize the authority it already has."

USA: Bill to Regulate Sale of Irradiated Food in New Jersey 'Not Scientifically Justified,' Says NFPA

19 Jun 2000

A bill to regulate the sale of irradiated foods in New Jersey was strongly opposed by the National Food Processors Association (NFPA) at a hearing held on June 19 by the State Assembly's Consumer Affairs and Regulated Professions Committee."NFPA and the food industry support food irradiation as a safe and effective technology that benefits consumers by enhancing the safety of the U.

USA: Texas District Court Ruling 'In No Way Undermines Laws And Regulations Governing Food Safety,' Says NFPA

26 May 2000

Today, in a Dallas, Texas U.S. District Court, Judge A. Joe Fish ruled in the Case of Supreme Beef that the United States Department of Agriculture cannot remove its inspectors from a processing facility based solely on the finding of Salmonella in raw ground beef. This ruling by Judge Fish "should not be construed as a threat to food safety or the progress already made by the food industry and USDA to implement Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Point systems and to enhance the safety of our nation's food supply," according to Dane Bernard, Vice President of Food Safety Programs for the National Food Processors Association (NFPA).

USA: GMA, Industry Groups Asks FDA, FTC to Explain 'Rules of the Road' For Non-Biotech Food Claims

8 May 2000

The Grocery Manufacturers of America and other food industry groups are asking U.S. regulatory agencies to establish guidelines that address claims about modern biotechnology. In particular, a petition to be filed with the Food and Drug Administration will ask the agency to explain some "rules of the road" for manufacturers who may want to use terms such as "GM-Free," "Non-GM," or others in food labeling.

USA: FDA Announcement 'A Win for Consumer Confidence in Biotechnology,' Says NFPA

4 May 2000

NFPA Calls Mandatory Review for New Biotech Food Products and Establishment Of Guidance for Label Claims 'The Right Decision'The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's announcement that the Agency will propose a mandatory review process prior to the marketing of new biotech food products, as well as guidance for making label claims for "biotech" or "biotech-free" products, "is a win for consumer confidence in the acceptability of food biotechnology," according to the National Food Processors Association (NFPA).

USA: FDA Announcement "A win for consumer confidence in Biotechnology", says NFPA

3 May 2000

(Washington, D.C.) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration's announcement that the Agency will propose a mandatory review process prior to the marketing of new biotech food products, as well as guidance for making label claims for "biotech" or "biotech-free" products, "is a win for consumer confidence in the acceptability of food biotechnology," according to the National Food Processors Association (NFPA).

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