Blog: Dean BestCadbury in race row over 'Eskimo' sweets

Dean Best | 23 April 2009

Confectionery giant Cadbury has become embroiled in a bitter row Down Under – and has been accused of being racist.

The UK group has faced the claims over its Pascall Eskimos product after a Canadian tourist reportedly said the use of the word 'eskimo' insulted Inuits.

According to local newspaper Taranaki Daily News, 21-year-old tourist Seeka Lee Veevee Parsons has provoked anger among New Zealanders.

"I heard when I was doing a radio interview [that] one of the producers said a caller had said "you should shut that b . . . . up" and others are saying "if you don't like it go back home." Why would New Zealanders support a candy rather than a person's insight in to their people and culture?" Parsons told the paper.

A Cadbury spokesman representing its businesses in Australia and New Zealand said the company had only ever received two complaints since the product was launched in 1955 – and one of those was from Parsons. “We have no intention to rename, reshape or remove the product, and trust that consumers will continue to enjoy Pascall Eskimos,” the spokesman sniffed.

So, an over-reaction from a sensitive consumer or an out-of-touch reaction from a company perpetrating negative stereotypes?


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