Blog: “It’s not (only) for girls”

Catherine Sleep | 20 February 2007

Remember the storm of controversy unleashed by Nestlé’s 2001 Yorkie chocolate bar campaign “It’s not for girls!”? The company irked feminists by arguing the chunky bar was a ‘man-sized eat’ not suited to the fairer sex.

Six years on it’s interesting to see fine chocolate maker Gorvett & Stone adopt a more subtle approach. The company has launched a range of what it terms “potent pralines, colourful caramels and tasty truffles with a very strong blokey bias”.

Naturally, I had to sample a few to see what they were on about. They might be called ‘man chocs’, but there’s nothing burly about them; they’re still pretty refined chocolates, in my book. First up was a 70% cocoa coffee cream with a delicate sprinkling of Demerara sugar on top – strong flavours, but velvety smooth texture. For one of its other man chocs, the company couldn’t resist the currently popular combo of chocolate and chilli, blending a range of different chillies with dark chocolate and cream to create a surprisingly smooth truffle with a kick.

It’s an interesting marketing tactic. We traditionally consider chocolates to be primarily a gift for women, but that’s old hat. My 11-year-old nephew happily requests fine chocolates for birthday presents – a true new man in the making – and these days it’s easy to imagine men buying their partners handmade chocolates and throwing a few ‘man chocs’ into the mix for good measure.

Gorvett & Stone


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