Blog: Katy AskewMore understanding needed of GMOs among consumers

Katy Askew | 20 July 2016

The introduction of legislation requiring the labelling of GMOs in the US has gathered widespread public support.

The bill, which has passed both Houses and is currently awaiting the President's signature, was welcomed by 88% of Americans, research from the Department of Life Sciences Communication at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania reveals. Moreover, a massive 91% of US consumers believe people have a right to know if food they consume contains GMOs.

With such strong support for GMO labelling – and indeed the weight of the food industry being thrown behind national legislation over state-by-state regulations – it is now important to support public debate on the subject.

The fact is, the majority of consumers are sceptical over the role of science in the food sector. This can, in turn, retard the industry's progress in important public health areas such as product reformulation.

According to the UW-Madison and U-Penn survey, while there is overwhelming public support for the labelling of GMOs, there is little understanding of the debate over their use in the public at large.

Indeed, only one in five people agreed that scientists have not found any risks to human health from eating genetically modified foods. Nearly half (48%) disagreed with that statement. Only 39% of people agreed that "GMO crops are safe to eat”.

Dominique Brossard, a visiting scholar at the Annenberg Public Policy Center, said it is "troubling" that only 1 in 5 people knew that scientists have not found evidence of adverse health effects from eating GM foods.

There are some valid concerns over the proliferation of genetically engineered crops. The unintended side effect of increased pesticide use and harm that this can cause health, cross contamination and the environmental implications should all be taken into account. More sustainable alternatives – such as regenerative agriculture – should be weighed in the debate.

But there should be a debate and it should be based on facts rather than misconceptions.

BLOG

Nature's Path quits US organic trade body in "protest"

The Organic Trade Association, which represents the organic industry in the US, has seen a high-profile member quit the organisation, taking a swipe at the body's stance on policy issues....

NEWS

Sodiaal forms four divisions to implement strategy

French dairy major Sodiaal has reorganised its business into four divisions as CEO Jorge Boucas, appointed last year, looks to hit the profitability targets he set in December....

BLOG

Early skirmishes in the Ketchup War

In the 1970s a squabble between the UK and Iceland over fishing rights in the North Atlantic earned the somewhat hyperbolic name of the Cod War....

NEWS

Ex-FrieslandCampina CFO Kees Gielen becomes Sodiaal finance chief

Former FrieslandCampina CFO Kees Gielen has been named operations and finance director at French dairy peer Sodiaal....

BLOG

Brexit could be worse for dairy than Russia ban, EU and UK producers warn

Russia's embargo on a swathe of foodstuffs from the EU in 2014 - a ban that lasts to this day - hammered the bloc's dairy industry. But producers on both sides of the English Channel have warned the i...

BLOG

Plenty of hot air as UK politicians grill Asda, Sainsbury's over merger

UK Parliamentary select committees at their best are meant to bring light rather than generate heat but this wasn't a select committee at its best....



Forgot your password?