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May 20, 2002

CANADA: Frozen King seafood brand cooked clam meat may contain dangerous bacteria

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning consumers, retailers and food service providers not to consume, distribute or serve uncoded Frozen King Seafood brand cooked clam meat acquired on or after 12 May 2002 because this product may be contaminated with Escherichia coli bacteria and may not have been kept properly frozen or otherwise stored. It is significant to note that the contamination found was not E. coli 0157:H7.

The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) is warning consumers, retailers and food service providers not to consume, distribute or serve uncoded Frozen King Seafood brand cooked clam meat acquired on or after 12 May 2002 because this product may be contaminated with Escherichia coli bacteria and may not have been kept properly frozen or otherwise stored. It is significant to note that the contamination found was not E. coli 0157:H7.

A certain shipment of Frozen King Seafood brand clam meat, originating from China, was under detention by the CFIA at an importer’s warehouse in Markham, Ontario. Ten cases of this product appear to have been stolen from this warehouse on 12 May 2002 and may be in public circulation.

Consumers, retailers and food service providers are warned that the affected product may still be  in uncoded 30lb. cases bearing the Frozen King Seafood brand name, as well as the statement “Quality Fresh Frozen”. Cases may contain as many as six uncoded and/or unlabelled plastic bags, with 5lb. of clam meat in each. Consumers should be wary of uncoded and/or unlabelled clam meat acquired on or after 12 May 2002. If in doubt as to the origin of the product, consumers are encouraged to check with their supplier to determine if the product is affected.

In addition, retailers and food service providers should also exercise due caution if purchasing cooked clam meat in uncoded and/or unlabelled containers on or after 12 May 2002. If in doubt as to the origin of the product, they too are encouraged to check with their supplier to determine if the product is affected.

Food contaminated with E. coli may not look or smelled spoiled. Consumption of food contaminated with this bacteria may cause gastrointestinal symptoms.

Persons with information concerning the apparent break and enter are encouraged to call  PC John Boothby or PC Ed Burke of the York Regional Police at (905) 881-1221 (ext. 7541).

For more information, consumers and industry can call the CFIA at one of the following numbers:

In the province of Quebec 1-800-561-3350; or
In other provinces and territories 1-800-442-2342.

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