View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter - data, insights and analysis delivered to you
  1. News
October 30, 2019

New EC study identifies high levels of fat, sugar and salt in packaged food products

The European Commission's Joint Research Centre (JRC) has published the results of its survey looking at the levels of sugar, salt and fat in packaged food items sold in the EU.

By Leonie Barrie

A study published by the European Commission’s Joint Research Centre (JRC) has found up to two-thirds of packaged food products frequently sold in the European Union contain too much sugar, salt and fat, and not enough fibre.

Free Whitepaper
img

6 Keys to Simplified Labeling Changes in Life Sciences

If you are responsible for managing the change process of labels and related components, or if you’re a stakeholder in the process, you likely have a good understanding of its complexities and challenges. From automated quality checks to organisational change management, leading life sciences label management experts Esko explores here six ways you can simplify label changes and help mitigate the risk of costly – or fatal - labelling errors.
by Esko
Enter your details here to receive your free Whitepaper.

The JRC assessed packaged foods against marketing-related nutrition standards developed by European public- and private-sector organisations.

Working from a 2016 database covering 20 EU countries, the JRC scientists evaluated the nutritional composition of 2,691 products in five product categories (breakfast cereals, ready meals, processed meat, processed seafood, and yogurts).

It found that between half to two-thirds of all the products analysed were ineligible for marketing to children because of a high level of unhealthy ingredients.

The JRC found that many breakfast cereals and yogurts were too high in sugars, while processed meat, processed seafood, and ready meals had too much salt. Breakfast cereals did not have sufficient fibre and yogurts were too high in total and saturated fat.

“This is a matter of concern and may explain, in part, the high child obesity rates and health and economic burden of chronic diseases,” it said.

It suggested “balanced measures” are need to achieve gains for public health and called for “product innovation and reformulation of foods” as a strategy to improve the nutrient balance of the food supply. 

“The JRC study shows that efforts at scale are needed and repeating this analysis over the coming years could help monitor the necessary progress to achieve gains for public health,” it said.

The JRC study was based on two nutrient profile models. One model was developed by the private sector (EU Pledge) and the other by the World Health Organization’s Regional Office for Europe (WHO Europe).

Related Companies

Free Whitepaper
img

6 Keys to Simplified Labeling Changes in Life Sciences

If you are responsible for managing the change process of labels and related components, or if you’re a stakeholder in the process, you likely have a good understanding of its complexities and challenges. From automated quality checks to organisational change management, leading life sciences label management experts Esko explores here six ways you can simplify label changes and help mitigate the risk of costly – or fatal - labelling errors.
by Esko
Enter your details here to receive your free Whitepaper.

NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. A weekly roundup of the latest news and analysis, sent every Friday. The industry's most comprehensive news and information delivered every other month.
I consent to GlobalData UK Limited collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU

Thank you for subscribing to Just Food