View all newsletters
Receive our newsletter - data, insights and analysis delivered to you
  1. News
August 4, 2021updated 12 Aug 2021 10:47am

Oxfam calls for net-zero re-think amid food security, price rise fears

The charity suggests net zero carbon targets could become a “dangerous distraction that could delay the rapid reductions in emissions".

UK-based charity Oxfam has called for governments and companies to re-think their net zero climate targets, suggesting current strategies could threaten global food security and push food prices up 80% by 2050.

Free Report
img

What’s the forecast for the food and grocery industry?

The food and grocery sector thrived during the pandemic, largely due to the shutdown of the food service industry and the sector’s subsequent necessity, panic-induced bulk purchasing, and spending more time at home. The market has grown as a result of inflation. Consumer unwillingness to go out and socialize, and the reopening of several hospitality facilities, helped maintain the demand for groceries, particularly online, in 2021. As consumer behavior changes, we consume more food and drink at home, and inflation increases basket sizes. GlobalData predicts that the sector will continue to hold a higher share than had been predicted prior to the pandemic. This is true despite the fact that the food and grocery sector's share of overall retail will decline from its peak in 2020. This report will discuss market forecasts and key themes in the global food & grocery industry in 2022 and beyond. It covers:
  • Market drivers and inhibitors
  • Five-year forecasts and the impact of COVID-19
  • The performance of the online channel versus offline
  • Major trends in the market including rapid delivery, ambient retailing, supply chain disruption, and inflation
Assess developments within this sector to help your business thrive in 2022 and beyond.
by GlobalData
Enter your details here to receive your free Report.

In a new report – Tightening the net: Net zero climate targets implications for land and food equity – the charity said net zero carbon emission targets could become a “dangerous distraction that could delay the rapid reductions in emissions that high-emitting countries and companies need to make if we are to avoid catastrophic climate breakdown”.

Its main concern is that to reach net zero targets, businesses – including some food heavyweights – and governments are relying on tree-planting – reforestation and creating new forests – to offset carbon emissions rather than reducing those emissions.

“Without clear definition, however, these targets risk being reliant on using vast swathes of land in low-income countries to capture carbon emissions, allowing the biggest emitters to avoid making significant cuts in their own emissions,” it said.

It said net zero initiatives ”could also lead to an explosion in demand for land which, if not subject to careful safeguards, might risk increasing hunger and fuelling land inequality”.

Oxfam suggests land needed for reforestation projects would encroach on that needed for crops to feed growing populations.

The charity added: “Net zero should be a pathway to real and transformative climate action and not greenwash. Carbon emissions need to be reduced now, and land-based climate solutions must centre on ‘food-first’ approaches that help achieve both zero emissions and zero hunger.”

It wants “companies [to] cut emissions in their own operations and supply chains first and foremost” and to see “transparent targets that distinguish between reducing and removing carbon”.

Ahead of the COP26 climate summit in Glasgow, the charity is demanding that there is a much stronger focus on cutting carbon emissions in the near term (by 2030).

“Unless the biggest emitters of carbon dioxide take urgent action to cut emissions by about half by the end of the decade, runaway climate breakdown will become inevitable,” it said.

In its report, Oxfam suggest it is “mathematically impossible” to plant enough trees to meet the combined net zero targets announced by governments and corporations.

It has calculated that the total amount of land required for planned carbon removal could potentially be five times the size of India, or the equivalent of all the farmland on the planet.

Related Companies

Free Report
img

What’s the forecast for the food and grocery industry?

The food and grocery sector thrived during the pandemic, largely due to the shutdown of the food service industry and the sector’s subsequent necessity, panic-induced bulk purchasing, and spending more time at home. The market has grown as a result of inflation. Consumer unwillingness to go out and socialize, and the reopening of several hospitality facilities, helped maintain the demand for groceries, particularly online, in 2021. As consumer behavior changes, we consume more food and drink at home, and inflation increases basket sizes. GlobalData predicts that the sector will continue to hold a higher share than had been predicted prior to the pandemic. This is true despite the fact that the food and grocery sector's share of overall retail will decline from its peak in 2020. This report will discuss market forecasts and key themes in the global food & grocery industry in 2022 and beyond. It covers:
  • Market drivers and inhibitors
  • Five-year forecasts and the impact of COVID-19
  • The performance of the online channel versus offline
  • Major trends in the market including rapid delivery, ambient retailing, supply chain disruption, and inflation
Assess developments within this sector to help your business thrive in 2022 and beyond.
by GlobalData
Enter your details here to receive your free Report.

Topics in this article:
NEWSLETTER Sign up Tick the boxes of the newsletters you would like to receive. A weekly roundup of the latest news and analysis, sent every Friday. The industry's most comprehensive news and information delivered every other month.
I consent to GlobalData UK Limited collecting my details provided via this form in accordance with the Privacy Policy
SUBSCRIBED

THANK YOU

Thank you for subscribing to Just Food