Haribo is to launch a new marketing push for Maoam in the UK. Haribo’s fruit-chew confectionery brand Maoam, which was launched in 2001, is set to roll out a new advertising campaign targeting its favoured group, 10-15 year olds. While the tweenage group can be tricky to tap into, a carefully directed multimedia strategy could prove ultimately highly rewarding for the company.


Haribo is apparently embarking on a new TV advertising campaign for Maoam confectionery based around the theme that once customers try its fruit chews they will ‘go mad for it’. According to the Mad.co.uk report, the advertisements feature different characters going to extreme lengths to get the sweets, including a zoologist fighting with a gorilla to save his sweet from being eaten by the animal.


According to the report, Haribo is deliberately looking to ensure the Maoam TV adverts are suitably off the wall. Such irreverence may be a sensible approach: teens and tweens are becoming increasingly wise to, and wary of, marketing spin and tend to reject brands trying to promote themselves as cool. Using ads that do not appear to explicitly tap into the age group in this way is one way of avoiding such perceptions from an increasingly cynical market segment. Therefore, targeting tweens and teens less directly with fun and humorous advertising campaigns that will also appeal to all ages is more likely to prove successful. 


The firm will support the advertising campaign with below-the-line activities that will help to generate further publicity. Additional print media placements will help to distribute product and campaign information, while a sampling road show should generate extra word of mouth. A national freestyle dance competition targeted at teens could also promote the ‘cool’ tag for the Maoam brand that is so useful for CPG players, using a more sophisticated, connotative approach.


Haribo will be looking to build on Maoam’s existing foothold in the UK market. The decision to look beyond the obligatory TV promotions by associating with youth-oriented sports activities, as well as acknowledging the limitations of conventional marketing techniques to youngsters, means this multi-faceted campaign should help it succeed in this process.


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